Asking for Powerlifting Help On The Internet Is Dumb

Opinion: Asking For Help On The Internet Is a Bad Idea. Especially when you already pay an expert for their consulting. . Let me elaborate here. . I’m part of quite a few Facebook lifting groups and it’s common practice to post up some videos asking how to solve X problem. This is not what I take issue with. What

Opinion: Asking For Help On The Internet Is a Bad Idea.

Especially when you already pay an expert for their consulting. . Let me elaborate here. . I’m part of quite a few Facebook lifting groups and it’s common practice to post up some videos asking how to solve X problem. This is not what I take issue with.

What does shock me often though is the number of lifters I’ll talk with who ALREADY HAVE A COACH and instead of opening a discussion with their coach of how to fix said problem, decide to ask the peanut gallery for random advice. . Am I the only one who thinks that’s whack?

Presumably you’ve done your due diligences when hiring your coach and they are/should be well equipped with the tools to help you fix whatever problems you’re working on with your lifts and you’re going to ignore that whole system they’ve laid out and instead ask some strangers who haven’t even done an assessment on you?

Crazy.

Then, we can always flip the script here. As a coach, the number of people I see trying to offer unsolicited advice to my athletes that directly contradicts the work we are doing. Also highly counterproductive.

If you’re a lifter with a coach, TRUST YOUR DAMN COACH and be open with your communication with them. ASK when you have questions/problems. If they’re worth their salt, they will have an answer or at least find one for you.

If you’re a coach and someone already has one: stay in your dang lane and don’t coach other coach’s lifters… You’d probably be pretty mad if the tables were turned 🙂