5 Tools To Add 40lbs to Your Deadlift

1. Train conventional if you pull hybrid or sumo.It’s got GREAT carryover for most lifters who pull with a wider stance. Spending a hypertrophy and strenght block working on conventional strength before transitioning back into sumo tends to yield some really strong pulls. If you have mobility limitations or back issues that prevent you from consistently pulling conventional, try block

1. Train conventional if you pull hybrid or sumo.
It’s got GREAT carryover for most lifters who pull with a wider stance. Spending a hypertrophy and strenght block working on conventional strength before transitioning back into sumo tends to yield some really strong pulls. If you have mobility limitations or back issues that prevent you from consistently pulling conventional, try block pulls or trap bar deads.

2. Don’t just focus on weak points.
As an intermediate/advanced lifter, I FIRMLY believe you should spend just as much time playing to your strengths as you do your weaknesses. If you’re strong at lockout but weak off the floor, alternate between blocks of deficit work (bottom ROM focus) with block pulls, chains, and/or bands (top ROM focus). This tends to work better than simply using one or the other.

3. Alternate Light(er) days with your heavy ones.
As you get stronger, pulling heavy 2+ days a week becomes less and less realistic. Aim to have a heavy DL session every 5-10 days, spacing it out with 1-3 light/medium sessions where you adjust load and maybe even work in some different deadlift variations. This keeps you from detraining in the time between heavy sessions but avoids overtaxing you so you can still progress and keep healthy.

4. Touch and Go =/= “Bounce and Go”.
TnG gets a bad rap from lifters who bounce the SHIT out of the bar in order to get more reps. When used responsibly, a TnG pull where the bar meets the floor but doesn’t rebound is an amazing tool for building technique as well as developing the deadlift musculature.

5. Know your “variation of choice”.
If you’re someone who responds well to/need some variation from the main lifts, knowing which secondary movements you can train which positively correlate to your 1RM strength on the competition movements is PURE GOLD. Knowing that adding 10 lbs to your block pull is 10-20 lbs on your 1RM comp deadlift gives you some serious programming tools to work with when working towards a new PR.