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Find The Right Way To Work Out

Learn the right ways to workout to increase your strength or sport performance.

Break Through That Plateau

Whether you’re stuck and can’t seem to continue progressing towards your strength and physique goals, or just getting bored of the same old thing, we can help you gain back momentum!

Get Over Your Injury

Have an injury or keep running up against the same old recurring injuries which are preventing you from reaching your potential? We can help to build you back up while avoiding the many setbacks which would normally prevent you from progressing.

Matt Taylor, CPT, FMS, Pn1

Certified Personal Trainer

CanFitPro Certified Personal Training Specialist (PTS)

DNS Exercise

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization is a unique way of bracing and moving which improves force output and safety while performing strength movements.

PRI Trained

Postural Restoration Institute techniques allow for an optimization of the Zone of Apposition to ensure maximum safety and efficiency in lifting as well as providing a unique way to improve mobility without wasting time on passively stretching without improving movement quality

Adaptive Bodywork

Level 1 Certified.

Reduce pain and muscle tightness with a unique manual therapy method.

Functional Movement Screen

Level 2 certified

Precision Nutrition

Level 1 certified

Exponentially improve your results from your training by taking your diet and nutrition into account.

World Powerlifting Champion

1st Place, Men’s Sub-Junior, AAU World Powerlifting Championship Oct, 2014

Post Rehab Certified

How do you get back in to exercising after an injury and physiotherapy? We can help!

CPR/AED

CPR/AED certified and renewed annually.

Chad Nabe, NSCA-CPT

Certified Personal Trainer

National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Certified Personal Trainer

DNS Exercise

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization is a unique way of bracing and moving which improves force output and safety while performing strength movements.

PRI Trained

Postural Restoration Institute techniques allow for an optimization of the Zone of Apposition to ensure maximum safety and efficiency in lifting as well as providing a unique way to improve mobility without wasting time on passively stretching without improving movement quality

Adaptive Bodywork

Level 1 Certified.

Reduce pain and muscle tightness with a unique manual therapy method.

Provincial Level Powerlifting Competitor

British Columbia Powerlifting Association, Provincial Championship, June 2014.

SFU Rowing Team

Simon Fraser University Rowing team, Seat 8. Regional competitor, 2010.

CPR/AED

CPR/AED certified and renewed annually.

A Targeted Approach to Threshold Training: Understanding Intention

In the myriad of exercises on the internet, you’ll see a division between “functional” exercise and pure strength work. Understanding how to differentiate between the different thresholds of exercise and train accordingly can give you more out of your training program. In my previous article, I outlined how to raise the ceiling on your high threshold movements by addressing your functional thresholds. This article will be based around differentiating between the levels of thresholds that you can train with and their respective merits. With powerlifting training, there will be 3 main types of thresholds that you can work with; low, high, and medium. Low threshold activities: These are generally tasks that represent very low effort and low amounts of tension. Sleeping, walking around, eating dinner. The nervous system will sit in a “rest and digest”, parasympathetic state. Consider this like having your car turned off and sitting in a parking lot. You could probably do this indefinitely Medium Threshold Activities: These fall between low and high threshold activities. Things like bicep curls, lunges, etc will fall into this category. There is some tension going on but it is far from maximal. Think of this as driving the speed limit. Your car engine can withstand this for a long time, but you’ll need to stop for gas eventually. High Threshold Activities: Of the highest caliber, these can be considered the most stressful activities. Things like a 1 rep max back squat, a street fight, and sprints are all examples of high threshold activities. Going back to our car example, this would be the equivalent to redlining your car on a top... read more

Threshold Training for Powerlifting: a Targeted Approach

When you are looking to improve your form when lifting, as well as lift more weight efficiently, one of the most important considerations is the thresholds of exercise. The internet is filled with corrective exercise demonstrations and it can be tough to wade through the chaos and know what will fix your specific issue. This is where understanding what threshold your issues fits into is beneficial. In powerlifting terms, there are 2 types of thresholds: absolute and functional. When something is trained below the “threshold”, it fails to produce a sufficient stimulus and as such, you don’t create adaptation/progress. We will look at how to find the maximum capacity of both these systems, by using the functional threshold to do so. An absolute threshold is the absolute maximum that you can do. An example of this would be a 1 rep max, with whatever form changes you might make in order to get it up. This might not look like your “ideal/good technique”, but the weight went up, and that’s all this threshold reflects. The sport of powerlifting heavily emphasizes this threshold as it’s the one that wins medals. Functional thresholds reflect how much you can push without degradation in technique. Because of the nature of this limit, it will always sit lower than the absolute threshold; though we should always aim to close the gap between the functional and absolute thresholds as this tends to lead to better efficiency with lifting as well as a theoretically reduced risk of injury. Within the functional threshold category, there are 3 subsets that are relevant to powerlifting: 1. Endurance/Fatigue Threshold We... read more

A Guide to Applying DNS/PRI Principles to Powerlifting (Part 3: Deadlift)

If you haven’t already seen Part 1 and Part 2 to this series, I strongly recommend reading that first as it lays down the groundwork for what we are diving into here. Today’s installment in the PRI/DNS to Powerlifting series will focus in on the deadlift. Before we dive in, I just wanted to make a quick note on this article series: I am making this series to help lifters and coaches understand how to use these trains of thought as tools and some scenarios where it might be helpful. It is by no means the only tool that you should have in your toolbox. PRI and DNS don’t solve every problem that you’ll encounter in powerlifting, but they can be a good starting point to work from. As much as I’d like knowing how to do powerlifting and these modalities together to be the silver bullet to perfect, efficient movement and absolute injury prevention, they aren’t that, and if they were… I’d probably be a lot richer by now. That being said, let’s get down to business. Today’s article will be broken down into 2 main sections: Addressing the positions of the deadlift, particularly in the setup, Transferring the foundation you lay with the set up into an efficient deadlift Part 1: Set Up For Success Not wanting to make this article a deadlift tutorial, let’s assume if you’re reading this article, you have some experience deadlifting and understand some basic principles like bracing, a hip hinge, and working to shorten the range of motion effectively while playing to your leverages. The most common “error” that we see in... read more

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Inspiring Success Stories

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Incredible. Matt has brought me to a level of fitness I haven’t experienced in years. Having trained with over a dozen different trainers in Vancouver, I can honestly say Matt is head and shoulders above the rest. His solid knowledge and honest encouragement is a fantastic benefit to anyone looking to reach their true potential. But the most important trait he brings to the table is his attention to detail. The perfection of movement and form he imparts reaches a level where you feel the difference. Every session builds upon the last, and I have made amazing strides thanks to his smart approach to goal-setting and continuous progress. Imagine the body you want, and the confidence that comes with it. Matt will get you there.

Since beginning training with Matt, I have achieved:

-5 lbs of fat loss

-muscle size and density increase

– better sense of flexibility

– adoption of myofascial release exercises

– greater awareness of daily calaoric intake

– improved movement and form during exercises

Alexander Glua

Alexander Glua Photography

I began training with Matt seven months ago; starting from nothing. I had never lifted weights in my life. Having a background in gymnastics made it easier to understand physical queues, but I still had no idea what I was doing. Now I have others complimenting my form is any time I step into the squat rack (and I thought they were supposed to be difficult!). My trainer not only knows how to lift, but how to adjust training depending on your individual body, in order to achieve your goals. Starting with an incredible trainer has paid off and I plan to continue working with Matt and seeing how far I can push myself. If anyone can help you realise your potential, it’s him. You’ll be glad you signed up..

Shayla Fowler

Medical Lab Technician

Matt taught me key exercises and stretches that were specific to my goals to improve my sport performance (higher strength to weight ratio, explosive power, higher vertical jump, ect.). He was professional and extremely knowledgeable about weight lifting form and technique. I especially appreciated his motivational attitude. He pushed me to surpass my own expectations of myself (as a woman in a mostly male weight room, I gained confidence in my abilities and Matt encouraged me to ignore any pre-conceived notions of what types of exercises women can and/or should do). He emphasizes stretching, accommodates injuries (I had a broken little toe midway through training), and writes out progressive workout plans. A great overall experience.

Sonja Brenner

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